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Sheffield

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Abstract

This chapter presents results from a variationist study of middle-class Sheffield English (Finnegan 2011). Twenty-four Sheffield-born participants from three age groups were interviewed using the <i>Survey of Regional English</i> method of data elicitation (Llamas 2001, 2007). The chapter focuses on the apparent-time distribution of face and goat variants. The results show parallel variation in both variables, with [&#603;&#618;]/[o&#650;] being favoured over [e&#720;]/[&#596;&#720;]. Use of the closing diphthongs is at a very advanced stage, while the use of [&#629;&#720;] is a more recent innovation. The different variants are hypothesised as indexing different types of identity. The closing diphthongs are interpreted as indices of a middle-class Sheffield identity, while the fronted goat monophthong is interpreted as indexing a Yorkshire identity.

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