Visit www.benjamins.com

Passive to anticausative through impersonalization

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
This Chapter is currently unavailable for purchase.
Abstract

Vedic Sanskrit and other Indo-European languages attest a typologically remarkable change of passives to anticausatives. This semantic development is attested, foremost, for passives of several verbs of perception and knowledge (knowledge transfer) obviously, according to the scenario &#8216;Y is seen (known etc.) by smb.&#8217; &#8594; &#8216;Y is seen (known etc.) [by smb.]&#8217; &#8594; &#8217;Y is seen (known etc.) [by generic passive agent]&#8217; &#8594; &#8216;Y is visible (famous, etc.)&#8217;. A special variety of this development is instantiated by the passive of a verb of speech, <i>ucyate</i> &#8216;Y is pronounced&#8217; &#8594; &#8216;Y [e.g. speech, musical instrument] sounds&#8217;. In addition, passive to anticausative transfer is attested for a small subgroup of verbs of caused motion. While in this latter case the rise of anticausative usages may be due to conceptualizing simple transitives as causatives (<i>throw</i> = &#8216;emake fall, make fly&#8217;, etc.), in cases of verbs of perception and knowledge we observe the rise of the anticausative usages through the stage which is called &#8216;impersonalization&#8217; in Siewierska 1984 and explained in terms of &#8216;objectivization of knowledge&#8217;, i.e. knowledge without a knowing subject. In connection with these verbs, I will briefly discuss the relationships between &#8216;agentless&#8217;, &#8216;impersonalized&#8217; and &#8216;impersonal&#8217; passives. Keywords: passive; anticausative; impersonalization; impersonal passive; verbs of perception; objectivization; Vedic; Indo-European

References

/content/books/9789027287168-08kul
dcterms_subject,pub_keyword
6
3
Loading
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address