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Training graduate students and community members for native language documentation

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Abstract

In a world where “remote” communities have cell phones, some internet access, and are tied to national and international webs of commerce and socialization, linguistic study must be attuned to the desires and expectations of the host community and graduate students must, in addition to training in phonetics, transcription, use of technology for recording and analyzing the language, learn to work with language brokers and develop goals for their research conjointly with the speakers who facilitate their data, while writing for the (academic) community. Student projects may range from salvage to revitalization, from documentation to theoretic exploration. Projects co-constructed with the host community promise to give both local and academic communities the greatest satisfaction in goals, products, applications and dissemination.

References

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