Visit www.benjamins.com

Exceptional hiatuses in Spanish

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
This Chapter is currently unavailable for purchase.
Abstract

This paper provides a close examination of how Spanish speakers syllabify sequences of vocoids of rising sonority within the lexicon (e.g., <i>piano</i> &#8216;piano&#8217;, <i>persiana</i> &#8216;blind&#8217; or <i>historia</i> &#8216;history&#8217;). A survey with 246 words administered to 15 Peninsular Spanish speakers has enabled us to examine in a quantitative way the strength of prosodic and morphological conditions on the appearance of the so-called exceptional hiatuses (Navarro Tom&#225;s 1948; Hualde 1999, 2005; Colina 1999). The data in our study reveals that the word initiality effect is not as strong as stated in the literature and that there are large differences between speakers: within the same dialect, half of the informants have the word-initiality effect in words such as <i>piano</i> &#8216;piano&#8217; or <i>di&#225;logo</i> &#8216;dialogue&#8217;, while the rest have practically generalized the presence of a diphthong in this position. Interestingly, morpheme boundary effects are found in conservative speakers and their conditions differ depending on the paradigm: (a) in nominal forms, gliding is blocked when there is an intervening morpheme boundary and when the glide is a high back vowel (<i>virt</i>[u.&#193;o]<i>so</i> &#8216;virtuous&#8217; vs. <i>od</i>[&#193;jo]<i>so</i> &#8216;hateful&#8217;, <i>act</i>[u.&#193;a]<i>l</i> &#8216;present&#8217; vs. <i>cord</i>[&#193;ja]<i>l</i> &#8216;cordial&#8217;); (b) in verbal paradigms, gliding is blocked when there is an intervening morpheme boundary and when the high vowel can be stressed in some form of the paradigm (<i>conf</i>[i.&#193;a]<i>r</i> &#8216;to trust&#8217;, <i>conf&#237;o</i> &#8216;I trust&#8217; vs. <i>camb</i>[&#193;ja]<i>r</i> &#8216;to change&#8217;, <i>cambio</i> &#8216;I change&#8217;). In general, the situation indicates that language change is in progress and that, for some speakers, the presence of lexical items that are pronounced with a hiatus is gradually disappearing. The article presents an analysis in terms of a correspondence-based OT analysis which captures the prosodic and analogical forces governing this process together with the interspeaker variation found in the data.

References

/content/books/9789027292629-09cab
dcterms_subject,pub_keyword
6
3
Loading
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address