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Information Design Journal

image of Information Design Journal
ISSN 0142-5471
E-ISSN 1569-979X

<p><em>Information Design Journal</em> (IDJ) is a peer-reviewed international journal that bridges the gap between research and practice in information design.</p><p>IDJ is a platform for discussing and improving the design, usability, and overall effectiveness of ‘content put into form’ — of verbal and visual messages shaped to meet the needs of particular audiences. IDJ offers a forum for sharing ideas about the verbal, visual, and typographic design of print and online documents, multimedia presentations, illustrations, signage, interfaces, maps, quantitative displays, websites, and new media. IDJ brings together ways of thinking about creating effective communications for use in contexts such as workplaces, hospitals, airports, banks, schools, or government agencies. On the one hand, IDJ explores the design of information, with a focus on writing, the visual design, structure, format, and style of communications. On the other hand, IDJ seeks to better understand the ways that people understand, interpret, and use communications, with a focus on audiences, cultural differences, readers’ expectations, and differences between populations such as teenagers, elderly or the blind.</p><p>IDJ publishes research papers, case studies, critiques of information design and related theory, reviews of current literature, research-in-progress, interviews with thought leaders, discussions of practical problems, book reviews, and conference information. Contributions should be relevant to a multi-disciplinary audience from fields such as: communication design, writing, typography, discourse studies, applied linguistics, rhetoric, usability research, instructional design and graphic design. Contributions should be based on appropriate evidence and make clear their implications for practice.</p><p>[Volumes 12 (2004) and 13 (2005) were published under the title <em>Information Design Journal</em> + <em>Document Design</em>]</p>

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  • News framing: Theory and typology
  • Towards a semiotics of typography
    • Author: Theo van Leeuwen
    • Source: Information Design Journal, Volume 14, Issue 2, 2006, pages: 139 –155
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    • This article outlines a social semiotic approach to analysing the ideational, interpersonal and textual meaning potentials of letter forms, drawing on Jakobson’s distinctive feature analysis and Lakoff and Johnson’s theory of experiential metaphor. Distinctive features are recognized and applied to the analysis of examples: weight, expansion, slope, curvature, connectivity, orientation and regularity.
  • Designing with a 2½D attitude
    • Author: Colin Ware
    • Source: Information Design Journal, Volume 10, Issue 3, 2000, pages: 258 –265
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    • Computer graphics gives us freedom to design highly interactive 3-D information spaces, but when will these be better? An analysis of human space perception reveals that the dimension of egocentric space towards and away from an observer is perceived very differently from the dimensions orthogonal to the line of sight. Because of the this property of perceptual space a strategy of designing with a 2½-D attitude is advocated and elaborated in a set of design principles.
  • Discourse cohesion in text and tutorial dialogue
    • Authors: Arthur C. Graesser, Moongee Jeon, Yan Yan, and Zhiqiang Cai
    • Source: Information Design Journal, Volume 15, Issue 3, 2007, pages: 199 –213
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    • Discourse cohesion is presumably an important facilitator of comprehension when individuals read texts and hold conversations. This study investigated components of cohesion and language in different types of discourse about Newtonian physics: A textbook, textoids written by experimental psychologists, naturalistic tutorial dialoguebetween expert human tutors and college students, andAutoTutor tutorial dialogue between a computer tutor and students (AutoTutor is an animated pedagogical agent that helps students learn about physics by holding conversations in natural language). We analyzed the four types of discourse with Coh-Metrix, a software tool that measures discourse on different components of cohesion, language, and readability. The cohesion indices included co-reference, syntactic and semantic similarity, causal cohesion, incidence of cohesion signals (e.g., connectives, logical operators), and many other measures. Cohesion data were quite similar for the two forms of discourse in expository monologue (textbooks and textoids) and for the two types of tutorial dialogue (i.e., students interacting with human tutors and AutoTutor), but very different between the discourse of expository monologue and tutorial dialogue. Coh-Metrix was also able to detect subtle differences in the language and discourse of AutoTutor versus human tutoring.
  • An evolving cognitive-semiotic approach to geographic visualization and knowledge construction
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