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Annual Review of Cognitive Linguistics

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ISSN 1572-0268
E-ISSN 1572-0276

<p>As of volume 8 (2010) this annual is continued as a journal: <a href="/content/journals/1877976x"><em>Review of Cognitive Linguistics</em></a></p><p>The <em>Annual Review of Cognitive Linguistics</em> (published under the auspices of the Spanish Cognitive Linguistics Association) aims to establish itself as an international forum for the publication of high-quality original research on all areas of linguistic enquiry from a cognitive perspective. Fruitful debate is encouraged with neighboring academic disciplines as well as with other approaches to language study, particularly functionally-oriented ones.</p>

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  • Do foreign language learners also have constructions?
    • Authors: Stefan Th. Gries, and Stefanie Wulff
    • Source: Annual Review of Cognitive Linguistics, Volume 3, Issue 1, 2005, pages: 182 –200
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    • In Construction Grammar, the ultimate grammatical unit is the construction, a conventionalized form-meaning pairing. We present interrelated evidence from three different methods, all of which speak in favor of attributing an ontological status to constructions for non-native speakers of English. Firstly, in a sentence-fragment completion study with German learners of English, we obtained a significant priming effect between constructions. Secondly, these priming effects correlate strongly with the verb-construction preferences in native speaker corpora: verbs which are strongly associated with one construction resist priming to another semantically compatible construction; more importantly, the priming effects do not correlate with verb-construction preferences from German translation equivalents, ruling out a translational explanation. Thirdly, in order to rule out an alternative account in terms of syntactic rather than constructional priming, we present semantic evidence obtained by a sorting study, showing that subjects exhibited a strong tendency towards a construction-based sorting, which even reflects recent explanations of how constructions are related.
  • Motion events in Spanish L2 acquisition
    • Authors: Teresa Cadierno, and Lucas Ruiz
    • Source: Annual Review of Cognitive Linguistics, Volume 4, Issue 1, 2006, pages: 183 –216
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    • The overall aim of this paper is to discuss how Talmy’s (1985, 2000) typological framework and Slobin’s (1996) thinking for speaking hypothesis can be fruitful for the investigation of how adult language learners come to express motion events in an L2. We report an empirical study which compares the expression of the semantic components of Path and Manner of motion by three groups of informants: (a) learners whose L1 and L2 belong to different typological patterns (Danish learners of Spanish; (b) learners whose L1 and L2 share the same typological pattern (Italian learners of Spanish); and (c) Spanish native speakers. Based on previous research on L1 acquisition, it was hypothesized that the Danish learner group would exhibit a higher degree of elaboration of the two semantic components than the other informant groups. The results of the study, however, show a limited role for the L1 thinking for speaking patterns in advanced second language acquisition.
  • Constructing a Second Language: Introduction to the Special Section
    • Authors: Nick C. Ellis, and Teresa Cadierno
    • Source: Annual Review of Cognitive Linguistics, Volume 7, Issue 1, 2009, pages: 111 –139
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    • This Special Section brings together researchers who adopt a constructional approach to Second Language Acquisition (SLA) as informed by Cognitive and Corpus Linguistics, approaches which fall under the general umbrella of Usage-based Linguistics. The articles present psycholinguistic and corpus linguistic evidence for L2 constructions and for the inseparability of lexis and grammar. They consider the psycholinguistics of language learning following general cognitive principles of category learning, with schematic constructions emerging from usage. They analyze how learning is driven by the frequency and frequency distribution of exemplars within construction, the salience of their form, the significance of their functional interpretation, the match of their meaning to the construction prototype, and the reliability of their mappings. They explore conceptual transfer and the acquisition of second language meaning. They consider the implications of these phenomena for L2 instruction.
  • Towards a corpus-based identification of prototypical instances of constructions
  • Mapping functional-cognitive space
    • Authors: Francisco Gonzálvez-García, and Christopher S. Butler
    • Source: Annual Review of Cognitive Linguistics, Volume 4, Issue 1, 2006, pages: 39 –96
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    • The aim of this paper is to describe in some detail the topography of the space occupied by functional and cognitive models. We describe the salient characteristics of functionalist, cognitivist and/or constructionist models against the general background of usage-based models, and also include in our discussion the parallel architecture framework of Jackendoff (1997, 2002a, 2002b), recently further refined as the Simpler Syntax hypothesis (Culicover & Jackendoff, 2005). A list of 36 features for the comparison of models is drawn up, and each of 11 approaches is discussed in the light of these features. Our conclusion is that although the study provides some evidence for the view that functionalist and cognitive and/or constructionist models occupy two partially distinct areas of functional/cognitive space, there is nevertheless a large group of features which are shared across all the types of model we have examined. Other groups of features allow us to distinguish between two major groups of models, one largely functionalist in its orientation, the other cognitivist and/or constructionist, the remaining models showing affinities with one or other of the two main groups, according to the feature concerned.
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