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Translation and Interpreting Studies. The Journal of the American Translation and Interpreting Studies Association

image of Translation and Interpreting Studies. The Journal of the American Translation and Interpreting Studies Association
ISSN 1932-2798
E-ISSN 1876-2700

<p><em>Translation and Interpreting Studies</em> (TIS) is a biannual, peer-reviewed journal designed to disseminate knowledge and research relevant to all areas of language mediation. <em>TIS</em> seeks to address broad, common concerns among scholars working in various areas of Translation and Interpreting Studies, while encouraging sound empirical research that could serve as a bridge between academics and practitioners. The journal is also dedicated to facilitating communication among those who may be working on related subjects in other fields, from Comparative Literature to Information Science. Finally, <em>TIS</em> is a forum for the dissemination in English translation of relevant scholarly research originally published in languages other than English. <em>TIS</em> is the official journal of the American Translation and Interpreting Studies Association (ATISA).</p>


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  • A professional ideology in the making: Bilingual youngsters interpreting for their communities and the notion of (no) choice
    • Author: Claudia V. Angelelli
    • Source: Translation and Interpreting Studies. The Journal of the American Translation and Interpreting Studies Association, Volume 5, Issue 1, 2010, pages: 94 –108
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    • Research on circumstantial bilinguals who become young interpreters for their families and communities contributes to our understanding of the life experiences of individuals who begin to interpret early in their lives. With the exception of early work on young interpreters and recent historical work on translation and interpreting, very little has been written about the lived experiences of interpreters and/or about the development of such exceptional types of bilingualism. When a family of Latino immigrants settles in America and the parents do not speak the societal language, it is often the case that young bilinguals act as language interpreters, brokering communication and advocating for their families’ needs. The ways in which these circumstantial bilinguals go about mediating communicative needs reveal much about these youngsters’ abilities. While interpreting for their families, young interpreters develop a sense of how to be linguistic advocates between speakers of minority languages and a society that struggles to accommodate the communicative needs of its members. In multilingual and diverse societies, it is imperative that the linguistic talents of young bilinguals be fostered and enhanced.
  • Shared representations and the translation process: A recursive model
    • Authors: Moritz Schaeffer, and Michael Carl
    • Source: Translation and Interpreting Studies. The Journal of the American Translation and Interpreting Studies Association, Volume 8, Issue 2, 2013, pages: 169 –190
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    • The purpose of the present paper is to investigate automated processing during translation. We provide evidence from a translation priming study which suggests that translation involves activation of shared lexico-semantic and syntactical representations, i.e., the activation of features of both source and target language items which share one single cognitive representation. We argue that activation of shared representations facilitates automated processing. The paper revises the literal translation hypothesis and the monitor model (Ivir 1981; Toury 1995; Tirkkonen-Condit 2005), and re-defines it in terms of findings from translation process research. On the basis of the evidence, we propose a recursive model of translation.
  • Habitus and self-image of native literary author-translators in diglossic societies
    • Author: Reine Meylaerts
    • Source: Translation and Interpreting Studies. The Journal of the American Translation and Interpreting Studies Association, Volume 5, Issue 1, 2010, pages: 1 –19
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    • Since in many cases past and present the professional translation field is not — or is only weakly — differentiated, the transposability of dispositions acquired through experiences related both to other fields and to translators’ larger life conditions and social trajectory may play a fundamental role in a translator’s habitus. Research on translators’ socio-biographies therefore deserves special attention. For native literary author-translators who live and work in a diglossic society characterized by socio-linguistic conflicts between the translators’ working languages, the plural and dynamic internalization of this conflict and of broader linguistic and cultural hierarchies is likely to form one of the constitutive aspects of their habitus and self-image, of their literary and translational behavior. In the first part of this article, I propose a tentative typology of Belgian native author-translators’ habitus and self-image according to potentially different internalizations of the Belgian linguistic conflict in their broader socialization process. In the second part, I present relevant aspects of the socio-biography of Camille Melloy, a native literary author-translator who translated between conflicting cultures in early twentieth century Belgium.
  • Occupation or profession
    • Author: David Katan
    • Source: Translation and Interpreting Studies. The Journal of the American Translation and Interpreting Studies Association, Volume 4, Issue 2, 2009, pages: 187 –209
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    • The main aim of this paper is to report on an online questionnaire which focused on translator and interpreter perception of their working world, their mindset or , and the impact of Translation Studies and university training on that world. Questions, both closed and open-ended, addressed academic/professional training, present role(s) and attitudes and beliefs about ‘the profession’ itself. Nearly 1000 respondents replied to the questionnaire worldwide. Particular questions focused on how translation should be taught, the role and status of the profession (ideally and in practice), and on personal satisfaction. The results show that university training has had little impact, and that this group of respondents have relatively little interest in the university itself in comparison with lifelong learning, with most emphasis placed on practice and self-development. Members of the group feel themselves to be ‘professional’ due to their specialized knowledge and abilities. However, their professionalism is mainly limited to their responsibilities to the text itself, and there is relatively little interest in the wider context. They are acutely aware of the lack of public recognition, and both the interpreters and the translators agree that translators in particular suffer from a markedly lower social status. However, only a minority of the respondents feel the need to change the status quo and satisfy trait theory criteria regarding professional recognition, possibly because the vast majority of respondents are more than satisfied with their job. In conclusion, it appears that translation can still only be categorized as an occupation rather than as a profession, and it is suggested that a new role be created with its own university course to cater to the professional language provider.

  • To count or not to count: Scientometrics as a methodological tool for investigating research on translation and interpreting
    • Authors: Nadja Grbić, and Sonja Pöllabauer
    • Source: Translation and Interpreting Studies. The Journal of the American Translation and Interpreting Studies Association, Volume 3, Issue 1-2, 2008, pages: 87 –146
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    • This paper discusses various different methods and tools of scientometrics, the way in which these can be used in translation and interpreting (T/I) studies and how T/I studies might benefit from such an approach. The authors outline both the potentials and pitfalls of such studies and discuss a number of different subjects of scientometric analysis. The paper also provides examples of scientometric research based on a small corpus of scientometric studies pertaining to T/I studies and pinpoints topics and subjects of research. The authors also explore, in a critical manner, the use (and abuse) of scientometric methods and the relationship between T/I studies and scientometrics. Special attention is paid to the way in which such methods can be combined with other (related) methods of social studies of science such as content analysis or network analysis.
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