1887

Brokering co-participants’ volition in request and offer sequences

image of Brokering co-participants’ volition in request and offer sequences

This chapter examines multilingual interactions where bilingual participants engage in advancing mutual understanding between other participants by language brokering (e.g. Bolden 2012) requests and offers from Finnish to Brazilian Portuguese. Brokering turns involve either (i) declarative statements regarding the prior speaker’s volition towards the requested/offered matter or (ii) questions concerning the recipient’s volition. The use of these formats displays the broker’s intersubjective interpretation of locally relevant features of the action, such as the distribution of benefits and agency, and contingencies in its realization. The investigation of language brokering in this context also contributes to research on requests, offers and related social actions (e.g. Couper-Kuhlen 2014), action ascription (Levinson 2013; Deppermann & Haugh forthcoming), and on verbs expressing volition (Sacks 1992: 181; Schulze-Wenck 2005).

  • Affiliations: 1: University of Helsinki

References

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    [Google Scholar]
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    2014 “On the Grammatical Form of Requests at the Convenience Store: Requesting as Embodied Action.” InRequesting in Social Interaction, ed. by Paul Drew , and Elizabeth Couper-Kuhlen , 243–268. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. 10.1075/slsi.26.10sor
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References

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    2010 “The Study of Child Language Brokering: Past, Current and Emerging Research.” MediAzoni10: 1–23.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Bolden, Galina
    2012 “Across Languages and Cultures: Brokering Problems of Understanding in Conversational Repair.” Language in Society41: 97–121. 10.1017/S0047404511000923
    https://doi.org/10.1017/S0047404511000923 [Google Scholar]
  3. Broth, Mathias , Jakob Cromdal , and Lena Levin
    2019 “Telling the Other’s Side: Formulating Others’ Mental States in Driver Training.” Language & Communication65: 7–21. 10.1016/j.langcom.2018.04.007
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.langcom.2018.04.007 [Google Scholar]
  4. Bybee, Joan L.
    1998 “‘Irrealis’ as a Grammatical Category.” Anthropological Linguistics40 (2): 257–288.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Childs, Carrie
    2012a “’I’m Not X, I Just Want Y’: Formulating ‘Wants’ in Interaction.” Discourse Studies14 (2): 181–196. 10.1177/1461445612439819
    https://doi.org/10.1177/1461445612439819 [Google Scholar]
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    https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2012-0034 [Google Scholar]
  7. Clayman, Steven E. , and John Heritage
    2014 “Benefactors and Beneficiaries. Benefactive Status and Stance in the Management of Offers and Requests.” InRequesting in Social Interaction, ed. by Paul Drew and Elizabeth Couper-Kuhlen , 55–86. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. 10.1075/slsi.26.03cla
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  9. Couper-Kuhlen, Elizabeth , and Marja Etelämäki
    2014 “On Divisions of Labor in Request and Offer Environments.” InRequesting in Social Interaction, ed. by Paul Drew , and Elizabeth Couper-Kuhlen , 115–144. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. 10.1075/slsi.26.05cou
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  11. Curl, Traci S. , and Paul Drew
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  13. 2012 “How Does ’Cognition’ Matter to the Analysis of Talk-in-Interaction?”Language Sciences34: 746–767. 10.1016/j.langsci.2012.04.013
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    [Google Scholar]
  16. Deppermann, Arnulf , and Julia Kaiser
    . (forthcoming). “Achieving the Intersubjectivity of Action and Enabling Coordination: Intention Ascriptions in Second Position with Du Willst/Sie Wollen (‘you want’) in German.” InAction Ascription. Interaction in Context ed. by Arnulf Deppermann , and Michael Haugh . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Drew, Paul , and Elizabeth Couper-Kuhlen
    (eds) 2014Requesting in Social Interaction. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. 10.1075/slsi.26
    https://doi.org/10.1075/slsi.26 [Google Scholar]
  18. Edwards, Derek , and Jonathan Potter
    2005 “Discursive Psychology, Mental States and Descriptions.” InConversation and Cognition, ed. by Hedwig te Molder , and Jonathan Potter , 241–259. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 10.1017/CBO9780511489990.012
    https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511489990.012 [Google Scholar]
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    https://doi.org/10.1075/z.syn1 [Google Scholar]
  20. Harjunpää, Katariina
    2017a “Translatory Practices in Everyday Conversation. Bilingual Mediating in Finnish–Brazilian Portuguese Interaction.” Ph.D. dissertation. Helsinki: University of Helsinki.
    [Google Scholar]
  21. 2017b “Mediated questions in Multilingual Conversation: Organizing Participation through Question Design.” InLinking Clauses and Actions in Social Interaction, ed. by Ritva Laury , Marja Etelämäki , and Elizabeth Couper-Kuhlen , 75–102. Helsinki: SKS.
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Heritage, John , and D.R Watson
    1980 “Aspects of the Properties of Formulations in Natural Conversations: Some Instances Analysed.” Semiotica30 (3/4): 245–262. 10.1515/semi.1980.30.3‑4.245
    https://doi.org/10.1515/semi.1980.30.3-4.245 [Google Scholar]
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    1971 Implicative Verbs. Language47 (2): 340–358. 10.2307/412084
    https://doi.org/10.2307/412084 [Google Scholar]
  24. Kendon, Adam , and Laura Versante
    2003 “Pointing by Hand in ‘Neopolitan’”. InPointing: Where Language, Culture, and Cognition Meet, ed. by Sotaro Kita , 109–137. New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Kendrick, Kobin H. , and Paul Drew
    2016 “Recruitment: Offers, Requests, and the Organization of Assistance in Interaction.” Research on Language and Social Interaction, 49 (1): 1–19. 10.1080/08351813.2016.1126436
    https://doi.org/10.1080/08351813.2016.1126436 [Google Scholar]
  26. Kärkkäinen, Elise , and Tiina Keisanen
    2012 “Linguistic and Embodied Formats for Making (Concrete) Offers.” Discourse Studies, 14 (5): 587–611. 10.1177/1461445612454069
    https://doi.org/10.1177/1461445612454069 [Google Scholar]
  27. Lev, Michael
    2014 “The Nanti Realis Status System.” Linguistic Typology18 (2): 251–288.
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Levinson, Stephen C.
    2013 “Action Formation and Ascription.” InHandbook of Conversation Analysis, ed. by Jack Sidnell , and Tanya Stivers , 103–130. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Lindström, Anna
    2005 “Language as Social Action: A Study of How Senior Citizens Request Assistance with Practical Tasks in the Swedish Home Help Service.” InSyntax and Lexis in Conversation. Studies in the Use of Linguistic Resources in Talk-in-Interaction, ed. by Auli Hakulinen , and Margret Selting , 209–230. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. 10.1075/sidag.17.11lin
    https://doi.org/10.1075/sidag.17.11lin [Google Scholar]
  30. Mondada, Lorenza
    2014 “Requesting Immediate Action in The Surgical Operation Room: Time, Embodied Resources and Praxeological Embeddedness.” InRequesting In Social Interaction, ed. by Paul Drew , and Elizabeth Couper-Kuhlen , 267–302. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. 10.1075/slsi.26.11mon
    https://doi.org/10.1075/slsi.26.11mon [Google Scholar]
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    https://doi.org/10.1080/08351813.2018.1413878 [Google Scholar]
  32. Raymond, Chase
    2014 “Epistemic Brokering in the Interpreter-Mediated Medical Visit: Negotiating ‘Patient’s Side’ and ‘Doctor’s Side’ Knowledge.” Research on Language and Social Interaction47 (4): 426–446. 10.1080/08351813.2015.958281
    https://doi.org/10.1080/08351813.2015.958281 [Google Scholar]
  33. Rossi, Giovanni
    2015: The Request System in Italian Interaction. Ph.D. Dissertation. Nijmegen: Radboud University.
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Rossi, Giovanni , and Jörg Zinken
    2017 “Social Agency and Grammar.” InDistributed Agency, ed. By Nick J. Enfield , and Paul Kockelman , 79–86. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190457204.003.0009
    https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190457204.003.0009 [Google Scholar]
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    1992Lectures on Conversation, Vol. I, ed. by Gail Jefferson . Oxford: Basil Blackwell.
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Schulze-Wenck, Stephanie
    2005 “Form and Function of ‘First Verbs’ in Talk-in-Interaction.” InSyntax and Lexis in Conversation. Studies on the Use of Linguistic Resources in Talk-in-Interaction, ed. by Auli Hakulinen , and Margret Selting , 319–348. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. 10.1075/sidag.17.16sch
    https://doi.org/10.1075/sidag.17.16sch [Google Scholar]
  37. Skårup, Terkel
    2004 “Brokering and Membership in a Multilingual Community of Practice.” InSecond Language Conversations, ed. by Rod Gardner , and Johannes Wagner , 40–57. London: Continuum.
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Sorjonen, Marja-Leena , and Raevaara, Liisa
    2014 “On the Grammatical Form of Requests at the Convenience Store: Requesting as Embodied Action.” InRequesting in Social Interaction, ed. by Paul Drew , and Elizabeth Couper-Kuhlen , 243–268. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. 10.1075/slsi.26.10sor
    https://doi.org/10.1075/slsi.26.10sor [Google Scholar]
  39. Stevanovic, Melisa
    2011 “Participants’ Deontic Rights and Action Formation: The Case of Declarative Requests for Action.” Interaction and Linguistic Structures52. Available at:www.inlist.uni-bayreuth.de/issues/52/Inlist52.pdf
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Zinken, Jörg
    2016Requesting for Responsibility. The Morality of Grammar in Polish and English Family Interaction. New York: Oxford University Press. 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190210724.001.0001
    https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190210724.001.0001 [Google Scholar]
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