1887
Volume 7, Issue 1
  • ISSN 2215-1354
  • E-ISSN: 2215-1362
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Abstract

Abstract

This paper presents a sociophonetic analysis of word-final /n/-elision in Ende (Pahoturi River; Papuan). An analysis of 73 speakers reveals that tense, phonological context, and most significantly, whether or not the speaker is a practitioner, a prestigious type of public oration, are significantly correlated with /n/-retention. A closer look at just five practitioners reveals that age and genre may also play a role. The present study matches Schokkin’s analysis of /n/-elision in Idi (this issue). Indeed, the findings support her conclusions that this pattern is one of /n/-elision (not /n/-addition) and show similarities in conditioning factors. Analysing sociolinguistic variation in this region presents a unique set of benefits and challenges. This paper discusses how emically-derived categories relating to age, clan, and orator status may deviate from characterisations of prestige in Westernised and urbanised societies but better fit southern New Guinea’s social context.

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2021-06-09
2021-06-19
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): age; elision; genre; oration; Pahoturi River; Papua New Guinea; Papuan; prestige; sociophonetic variation
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