1887
Volume 9, Issue 1
  • ISSN 2215-1354
  • E-ISSN: 2215-1362
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Abstract

Abstract

Topic-based style-shifting refers to the variation pattern that, when people talk about a topic, they shift to a linguistic style which is associated with the topic. Most of the research on topic-based variation in read speech have not taken stance-taking into consideration. This study argues that stance-taking needs to be included in the analysis of topic-based variation, for reading something aloud is a practice where individuals engage with the message communicated in a text. This study looks at the socially salient variable /ʂ/ in Taiwan Mandarin, and how deaf speakers exploit this variable to perform their stances towards a passage concerned with the political relationship between hearing people and deaf signers. The findings show that participants who demonstrate a stance of deaf solidarity diverge from standard speech styles in their repertoires when reading the deaf passage.

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/content/journals/10.1075/aplv.22001.wan
2023-07-24
2024-06-15
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