1887
Volume 13, Issue 1
  • ISSN 0155-0640
  • E-ISSN: 1833-7139
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Abstract

This paper examines the debate between process and genre approaches to language teaching and learning in a particular cross-cultural and English as a Second Language setting. It argues a position based on the analysis of both the respective theoretical assumptions as well as the evidence from classroom practice.

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1990-01-01
2019-10-17
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