1887
Volume 15, Issue 1
  • ISSN 0155-0640
  • E-ISSN: 1833-7139
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Abstract

Video in the classroom has been used mainly as source material for teacher and student exploitation. It is also used to a lesser extent as a medium for oral language development and self-evaluation where the content of the video is the learner’s own performance. This second use involves camera-work and providing feedback on learner performance.

This paper, based on a video programme conducted in an ESP course for Thai Government Officers over 2 years at the ELICOS Centre University of Sydney, argues that video is still under-utilised and can play a more integral role in programme development. We discuss how a more systematic approach to using video can develop learner self-monitoring strategies and communicative competence in a range of contexts.

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/content/journals/10.1075/aral.15.1.08jon
1992-01-01
2019-12-11
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