1887
Volume 15, Issue 2
  • ISSN 0155-0640
  • E-ISSN: 1833-7139
USD
Buy:$35.00 + Taxes

Abstract

More than 12,000 migrant engineers have migrated to Australia in the past four years – the majority NESB professionals of prime workforce age selected under the skilled immigration program.

These engineers are currently experiencing extreme levels of unemployment – in part due to Australia’s recession, but in part due to disproportionate labour market rejection.

This paper examines the critical ‘gatekeeping’ role of the employment interview. It explores the cultural attitudes a range of East European engineers bring to Australian engineering job interview questions – in particular ‘process’ questions (requiring detailed description of knowledge of engineering processes), and ‘self-promotion’ questions (inviting positive presentation of demonstrated professional skills).

The paper then analyses the videotaped job interview performance of two East European engineers, who answer such questions poorly in interviews conducted by the Institution of Engineers, Australia. The paper suggests that disparities between country of origin interview strategies and those used in Australia might usefully be targeted as areas for further research. Such research could lead to more effective cross-cultural interview training, while lessening the risk of interview failure.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1075/aral.15.2.06haw
1992-01-01
2019-10-22
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

  1. APES A (Association of Professional Engineers and Scientists, Australia)
    APES A (Association of Professional Engineers and Scientists, Australia) (1991) Unpublished letter to L. Hawthorne, in support of her research submission to the Bureau of Immigration Research on Labour Market Participation of Migrant Engineers: Barriers to Employment.
  2. Bennett, A.
    (1982) Strategies and counterslrategies in the use of yes/no questions in discourse. In J. Gumperz (ed.) Language and social identity. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. CAAIP (Committee to Advise on Australia’s Immigration Policies)
    CAAIP (Committee to Advise on Australia’s Immigration Policies) (1988) Immigration, a commitment to Australia. Canberra, Australian Government Publishing Service.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Clyne, M.
    (1985) Beyond grammar: Some thoughts on communication rules in our multicultural society. In J. B. Pride (ed.) Cross-cultural encounters: Communication and mis-communication. Melbourne, River Seine Publications.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Dodd, C. H.
    (1987) Dynamics of inter cultural communication. Iowa, W. C. Brown .
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Gumperz, J. and J. Cook-Gumperz
    (1982) Introduction: language and the communication of social identity. In J. Gumperz (ed.) Language and social identity. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. doi: 10.1017/CBO9780511611834.003
    https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511611834.003 [Google Scholar]
  7. Gumperz, J.
    (1982) Discourse strategies. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. doi: 10.1017/CBO9780511611834
    https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511611834 [Google Scholar]
  8. Gumperz, J. and D. Hymes
    (eds) (1972) Directions in sociolinguistics. New York, Holt, Rinehart & Winston.
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Hawthorne, L.
    (1992) Unpublished analysis of migrant engineer arrivals, by ethnicity and field, 1987 to 1991 inclusive. Raw data provided by the Department of Immigration, Local Government & Ethnic Affairs. Canberra.
  10. (1993 forthcoming) Labour market participation of migrant engineers: Barriers to employment. Melbourne, Bureau of Immigration Research.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Hussey, B. and L. Hawthorne
    (1989) English for occupational purposes: The Regent materials. Melbourne, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Institution of Engineers, NSW
    Institution of Engineers, NSW (1992, unpublished) Survey of engineering employers’ attitudes to migrant engineers’ employment.
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Keys, Sir W.
    (1990) Overseas skills recognition: The impact on business opportunities. In Developing your workforce for the future. Sydney, International Business Communications.
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Jupp, T. , C. Roberts and J. Cook-Gumperz
    (1982) Language and disadvantage: The hidden process. In J. Gumperz (ed.) Language and social identity. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Lalljee, M.
    (1987) Attribution theory and intercultural communication. In K. Knapp , W. Enninger and A. Knapp (eds) Analysing intercultural communication. The Hague: Mouton. doi: 10.1515/9783110874280.37
    https://doi.org/10.1515/9783110874280.37 [Google Scholar]
  16. Mishra, A.
    (1982) Discovering connections. In J. Gumperz (ed.) Language and social identity. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Niyi Akinnaso, F. and C. Seabrook Ajirotutu
    (1982) Performance and ethnic style in job interviews. In J. Gumperz (ed.) Language and social identity. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Office of Multicultural Affairs
    Office of Multicultural Affairs (1989) Towards a national agenda for a multicultural Australia. Canberra, Australian Government Publishing Service.
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Roberts, C. and P. Sayers
    (1982) Keeping the gate: How judgements are made in interethnic interviews. In K. Knapp , W. Enninger and A. Knapp (eds) Analysing intercultural communication. The Hague: Mouton.
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Williams, T.
    (1985) The nature of mis-communication in the cross-cultural employment interview. In J. B. Pride (ed.) Cross-cultural encounters: Communication and mis-communication. Melbourne, River Seine Publications.
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1075/aral.15.2.06haw
Loading
  • Article Type: Research Article
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was successful
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error