1887
Volume 41, Issue 3
  • ISSN 0155-0640
  • E-ISSN: 1833-7139
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Abstract

Abstract

In the famous Djuranydjura story from North-East Arnhem Land, when the visiting ‘Macassan’ offers the Yolŋu ancestral dog rice, shoes and blankets, he rejects them all, in favour of his own land and resources. At Gäwa homeland on Elcho Island, this powerful story is reinterpreted to include the arrival of (white) teachers, and their focus on English literacy. However, it is not that English literacy is devalued, but that it must maintain its proper place; negotiated to sit alongside the foundational literacy of the land, and Warramiri language itself. An approach of applying such a ‘Bothways’ pedagogy through utilising the ‘Accelerated Literacy’ methodology for languages and cultures is outlined to demonstrate that strengthened identity is attainable when the community moves together.

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2019-03-22
2019-10-20
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): Accelerated Literacy , Bothways philosophy , Gäwa , Warramiri language and Yolŋu education
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