1887
Volume 21, Issue 2
  • ISSN 0155-0640
  • E-ISSN: 1833-7139
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Abstract

The literature on autonomous learning indicates that role is a critical dimension in implementing learner autonomy. This paper examines the roles adopted by learners and teachers in language learning settings where the objective of promoting learner autonomy has been adopted. It does this first by exploring the ways in which different writers committed to autonomy have characterised learner and teacher roles. It then focuses specifically on language learning and considers how three variables – culture, learning mode and individual differences – might influence the roles which individuals actually adopt. The paper concludes by considering how new or modified roles might most effectively be presented.

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1998-01-01
2019-10-16
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