1887
Volume 54, Issue 2
  • ISSN 0521-9744
  • E-ISSN: 1569-9668
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Abstract

Translation and literary translation in particular, no longer can be seen as a static activity. In Austermühl’s words, the antiquated image of a lone translator, armed only with a pencil or typewriter and surrounded by dusty books, is no longer realistic. The translators are now learning to apply the new communication technologies like Internet in their work. The web log as a recent phenomenon in the cyber world can be applied in literary translation. However, it has been overlooked in translation studies, partly, in author’s opinion, because of its novelty but to large extend, because of its popularity as a platform or a personal diary for the novice bloggers, the authors of the web logs.In this article, the application of a web log by an Iranian literary translator in his Persian translation of Jhumpa Lahiri’s The Namesake is examined. By providing examples of the discussions between the translator and his visitors (readers), and by incorporating the web log in a model of translation studies, The Holmes–Toury map of translation studies, he tries to pinpoint the advantages of web log in literary translation in respect to its application as an online translation workshop. The author argues that the web log can be thoroughly applied in literary translation provided that the translator optimizes the quality of his web log or workshop by acknowledging the growing importance of new technologies available for him; and making informed decisions for the effective use of translation technology. What distinguishes the online translation workshop from its traditional one is its round-the-clock opening, facilitated interaction with the translator, absence of any formal setting and formality and instant access to available sources in Internet. The application of weblogs as an online workshop has some advantages for the literary translator: acting as a mediator between the translator and his potential readers; sharing the experiences, problems and seeking advice; and, creating a virtual, universal world around the translation which is bigger than his small, personal world.
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/content/journals/10.1075/babel.54.2.03had
2008-01-01
2019-10-18
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References

http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1075/babel.54.2.03had
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  • Article Type: Research Article
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