1887
Volume 7, Issue 2
  • ISSN 1384-6639
  • E-ISSN: 1569-9692
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Abstract

This article examines how and why the academically-based social sciences, both pure and applied, have lost their relevance to practical human affairs (praxis) and links this discussion to the reasons why action research is a marginal activity in the academic and policy worlds. It also contains a harsh critique of action research practice focused on action researchers’ combined sense of moral superiority over conventional researchers and general complacency about fundamental issues of theory, method, and validity. The central argument is that “doing good” is not the same as “doing good social research” and that we action researchers need to hold ourselves accountable to higher standards, not only to compete with conventional social research but for the benefit of the non-academic stakeholders in action research projects.

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/content/journals/10.1075/cat.7.2.02gre
2002-01-01
2018-12-16
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References

http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1075/cat.7.2.02gre
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