1887
Volume 22, Issue 1
  • ISSN 0172-8865
  • E-ISSN: 1569-9730
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Abstract

In this article, the past tense system of the verb to be in modern informal spoken British English is investigated. Variation is endemic, but an in-depth investigation across individual dialect areas shows that three generalization strategies can be distinguished. Of these, two lead to a straightforward simplification of the system (was-generalization and were-generalization respectively), whereas the dominant mixed type has remorphologized the Standard English (StE) number distinction and replaced it by a distinction according to polarity. A cognitive explanation is advanced for the pervasiveness of this at first glance rather complicated system.
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/content/journals/10.1075/eww.22.1.02and
2001-01-01
2019-12-11
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References

http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1075/eww.22.1.02and
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  • Article Type: Research Article
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