1887
Volume 45, Issue 2
  • ISSN 0172-8865
  • E-ISSN: 1569-9730
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Abstract

Abstract

This study relies on the constrained communication framework to compare the use of embedded inversion in English as a Foreign Language (EFL) and English as a Second Language (ESL). It is based on several (sub)corpora of EFL and ESL, but also reference corpora of native English, which differ along the constraint dimensions of language activation (monolingual/bilingual), proficiency (native users/proficient L2 users/learners), and modality (speech/writing). In addition to these constraint dimensions, we also investigate the possible effect of linguistic factors that have been claimed to play a role in the use of embedded inversion. A multifactorial analysis comparing embedded inversion with standard-like indirect questions, supplemented by a close examination of the patterns of use of embedded inversion, reveals both shared and distinctive features across EFL and ESL. It also highlights the importance of linguistic factors and variety/L1, and their interaction with communicative constraints.

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2024-07-02
2024-07-20
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