1887
Volume 20, Issue 2
  • ISSN 1568-1475
  • E-ISSN: 1569-9773
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Abstract

Abstract

In gesture studies, the adjective ‘recurrent’ has developed to distinguish a range of semiotic and conceptual phenomena concerning the nature of meaningful bodily movements. This article begins with a brief and recent history of recurrent gesture studies. We raise ongoing debates concerning the position of recurrent gestures on the so-called Kendon’s continuum, the relation between gestures and practical actions, and the interplay between gesture’s cultural specificity and universality. A selection of findings from previous research on recurrent gestures then acquaints readers with characteristics of these gestures: their form-function pairings and context-variation, linguistic organization and multimodal constructions, and community-specific typologies (from cultural, situational, as well as individual perspectives). Proposing to help build recurrent gesture theory, the paper then recognizes that recurrency goes hand-in-hand with  – both in the ways these gestures exist for members of a community and their role in the styles, habits, and creations of individuals.

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2022-05-30
2024-03-05
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): diversity; Kendon’s continuum; practical actions; recurrent gestures
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