1887
Volume 9, Issue 2-3
  • ISSN 0142-5471
  • E-ISSN: 1569-979X
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Abstract

Information design has traditionally attempted to develop its methods by creating logical sequences and structures to organize both the content and visual presentation of information. Creating clusters, categories, sequences and hierarchies, designers have achieved highly efficient ways of presenting complex information. The modernistic belief in universal s is today reinforced by notions of globalization fostered by end of the century capitalism. Nevertheless, it is increasingly evident that cognitive styles vary from people to people, and that human cognitive performance does not follow artificial intelligence models, but operates according to complex routines that are based on factors which are affected by individual and cultural make up. This article intends to articulate some of those factors, and some of the implications that their existence poses for design practice and education.
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/content/journals/10.1075/idj.9.2-3.03fra
1998-01-01
2019-10-16
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References

http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1075/idj.9.2-3.03fra
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  • Article Type: Research Article
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