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Abstract

Abstract

Analyzing variation in language features in literature and telecinematic discourse provides valuable insights into society’s shifting values and perspectives. In this study, we carry out a keyword analysis on the language of three series of television dialogues, broadcast in the 1960s, 1980s, and 1990s, from two perspectives: (i) keywords across the three series highlighting words that are unique to one series in contrast to the other two, providing insights about changes of foci across time; (ii) keywords in relation to gender depicting potential differences in gender roles and how these may change through time across the series.

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/content/journals/10.1075/ijcl.00037.cso
2020-11-02
2021-01-24
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