1887
Volume 22, Issue 4
  • ISSN 1384-6655
  • E-ISSN: 1569-9811

Abstract

(EP) is an ongoing empirical exploration of learner English initiated by Cambridge University Press and Cambridge English, among others. EP aims to create a set of empirically-based descriptions of language competencies for English. ‘Reference Level Descriptors’ already exist as part of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) but are intuitively derived and not designed for one specific language. The (EGP, www.englishprofile.org/english-grammar-profile) is a sub-project of EP which aims to profile learner competence in grammar. This paper details the rationale for the study and the methodology that was developed to investigate the Cambridge Learner Corpus to arrive at over 1,200 grammatical competence statements. Key findings which link to existing corpus-based second language acquisition work are also presented.

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2017-12-01
2019-12-14
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Keyword(s): CEFR , English Grammar Profile , learner competence , learner corpus and learner grammar
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