1887
Volume 2, Issue 1
  • ISSN 1384-6655
  • E-ISSN: 1569-9811
USD
Buy:$35.00 + Taxes

Abstract

This paper demonstrates the essential role of corpus data in the development of a theory that explains and predicts word behavior. We make this point through a case study of verbs of sound, drawing our evidence primarily from the British National Corpus. We begin by considering pretheoretic notions of the verbs of sound as presented in corpus-based dictionaries and then contrast them with the predictions made by a theory of syntax, as represented by Chomsky's Government-Binding framework. We identify and classify the transitive uses of sixteen representative verbs of sound found in the corpus data. Finally, we consider what a linguistic account with both syntactic and lexical semantic components has to offer as an explanation of observed differences in the behavior of the sample verbs.
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1075/ijcl.2.1.04lev
1997-01-01
2019-12-06
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1075/ijcl.2.1.04lev
Loading
  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): Corpus Analysis , Lexical Semantics , Syntax/Semantics Interface , Verb Meaning and Verbs of Sound
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was successful
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error