1887
Volume 9, Issue 1
  • ISSN 1384-6647
  • E-ISSN: 1569-982X
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Abstract

When interpreting takes place in a videoconference setting, the intrinsic technological challenges and the very remoteness of the interpreters’ location compound the complexity of the task. Existing research on remote interpreting and the problems it entails focusses on remote conference interpreting, in which the interpreters are physically separated from the conference site while the primary interlocutors are together on site as usual. In an effort to broaden the scope of research in the area of remote interpreting to include other types and to address other questions, in particular that of the interpreters’ adaptability to new working conditions, this paper analyses small-group videoconferences in which the primary interlocutors as well as the interpreters all work from different locations. The findings from an empirical case study (based on recordings of videoconference sessions as well as introspective data) are used to identify and exemplify different types of interpreter adaptation.
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/content/journals/10.1075/intp.9.1.03bra
2007-01-01
2019-10-20
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References

http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1075/intp.9.1.03bra
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