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Experimental Semiotics: A new approach for studying the emergence and the evolution of human communication
  • ISSN 1572-0373
  • E-ISSN: 1572-0381
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    Exploring the cognitive infrastructure of communication

  • Author(s): Jan Peter de Ruiter 1 , Matthijs L. Noordzij 2 , Sarah Newman-Norlund 3 , Roger Newman-Norlund 4 , Peter Hagoort 4 , Stephen C. Levinson 5  and Ivan Toni 4
  • View Affiliations Hide Affiliations
    Affiliations:
    1 Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands/Department of Linguistics and Literary Sciences. University of Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany
    2 F.C. Donders Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands/Department of Cognitive Psychology and Ergonomics, University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands
    3 F.C. Donders Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    4 F.C. Donders Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands/Nijmegen Institute for Cognition and Information, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    5 Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • Source: Interaction Studies, Volume 11, Issue 1, Jan 2010, p. 51 - 77
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1075/is.11.1.05rui

Abstract

Human communication is often thought about in terms of transmitted messages in a conventional code like a language. But communication requires a specialized interactive intelligence. Senders have to be able to perform recipient design, while receivers need to be able to do intention recognition, knowing that recipient design has taken place. To study this interactive intelligence in the lab, we developed a new task that taps directly into the underlying abilities to communicate in the absence of a conventional code. We show that subjects are remarkably successful communicators under these conditions, especially when senders get feedback from receivers. Signaling is accomplished by the manner in which an instrumental action is performed, such that instrumentally dysfunctional components of an action are used to convey communicative intentions. The findings have important implications for the nature of the human communicative infrastructure, and the task opens up a line of experimentation on human communication.
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/content/journals/10.1075/is.11.1.05rui
2010-01-01
2019-10-17
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References

http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1075/is.11.1.05rui
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  • Article Type: Research Article

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