1887
Volume 24, Issue 2
  • ISSN 1572-0373
  • E-ISSN: 1572-0381
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Abstract

Abstract

Understanding how animals might make sense of the interfaces they interact with is important to inform the design of animal-centered interactions. In this regard, provides a useful lens through which to examine animals’ interactions with interfaces and the sensemaking mechanisms that might underpin such interactions. This paper leverages Uexküll’s , Peirce’s and Gibson’s to analyze examples of dogs’ interactions with interfaces, particularly the role of the semiotic mechanisms of and . Based on these analyses, the paper derives design implications, and proposes a semiotic framework to support the analysis and design of canine-centered interactions. The framework could be subsequently extended to support the analysis and design of interactive systems for other species.

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2023-11-03
2024-06-23
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): affordance; animal-centered interactions; biosemiotics; dogs; indexicality; isomorphism
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