1887
Volume 105, Issue 1
  • ISSN 0019-0829
  • E-ISSN: 1783-1490
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Abstract

This article reviews theory and research on the second language learning environment as a source of input to learners and the contributions made by speakers in learners' environment to their input needs and requirements. Discussion centers on connections between the formal and interactional properties of input which have been identified in research on learners and learning environments and theoretical claims about their contributions to second language learning.

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1994-01-01
2019-12-09
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