1887
Volume 113, Issue 1
  • ISSN 0019-0829
  • E-ISSN: 1783-1490
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Abstract

The phenomenon of involuntary mental rehearsal or "Din in the head," has been associated by researchers with second language (L2) acquisition, primarily with beginning learners. This study provides new evidence for Din in association with the acquisition of new linguistic elements from a different population of language acquirers, advanced first language readers. The results lend support to the claims made by Krashen concerning the nature of L1 and L2 acquisition, and indicate a connection between acquisition and the perceived pleasure of the Din phenomenon. Possible implications for the selection of L1 and L2 classroom activities are discussed.

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1996-01-01
2019-10-22
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