1887
Volume 3, Issue 1
  • ISSN 2590-0994
  • E-ISSN: 2590-1001

Abstract

Abstract

Knowledge production in collaborative writing for publication has tended to be studied as fixed in time and place; few studies have focused on the drafting and redrafting of texts and the interactions among the co-authors involved. Using a approach to a research article co-authored by an exiled academic and his two more experienced co-authors, all using English as an additional language, this study investigates the impact of interactions during text production on the focal academic’s understanding of writing for English-medium international publication. We analysed the co-authors’ comments on the academic’s drafts, examining their (levels of directness and explicitness) and (disciplinary, writing, and publishing conventions) and the academic’s responses to these interventions. Analysis focused on s (written interactions relating to a specific point in the text and relevant textual changes throughout drafts). Findings revealed that interventions focused on multiple areas, with the co-authors acting as knowledge brokers in all domains. The interaction dynamics changed across the drafts, in the focus of interaction episodes and the levels of co-authors’ interventions provided to the academic, which created a space to negotiate interventions and, consequently, to enrich his understanding of writing practices for international publication in English.

Available under the CC BY 4.0 license.
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2022-06-02
2024-04-20
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