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Abstract

Abstract

Although recent years have seen a growth in studies examining teacher agency, educators working in the primary sector remain a relatively under-researched population. One specific group of teachers in primary education are those who teach Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL). In this study, we wanted to understand how CLIL primary teachers’ sense of agency helped them to navigate this professional role, considering factors in their ecologies which supported or inhibited their agency. Based on semi-structured, in-depth interviews with six primary school CLIL teachers, this study shows that even though these teachers were initially passionate about CLIL, they all ultimately exercised their agency as teachers in giving up on CLIL due to a limited sense of agency in the particular role as a CLIL educator.

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/content/journals/10.1075/jicb.20032.gru
2021-08-27
2021-10-21
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keywords: Österreich ; Handlungskompetenz ; CLIL ; Primarbereich ; Selbst ; self ; primary, Austria ; agency
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