1887
Volume 5, Issue 2
  • ISSN 2213-1272
  • E-ISSN: 2213-1280
USD
Buy:$35.00 + Taxes

Abstract

The historic wave of refugees reaching Europe in 2015 was met with a volatile mixture of ethno-nationalist, anti-Muslim fearmongering and political infighting within the European Union (EU). Perhaps no one was more influential in promulgating fear and anti-refugee sentiment than Viktor Orbán, the Prime Minister of Hungary, whose inflammatory rhetoric and uncompromising, illiberal political stance helped escalate the refugee-crisis in a discursive battle of political wills, ideologies, and identity politics within the EU. This paper explores how Orbán employs political discourse practices and strategies to enact his right-wing populist (RWP) ideology and anti-immigrant ‘politics of fear’ ( Wodak 2015 ) vis-à-vis EU politicians’ pro-migration discourses. Adopting a broad critical discourse-analytic approach, we demonstrate Orbán’s iterative production of discourses of threat and defense underlying discourses of fear (law and order, cultural/religious difference), and discourses of oppositional political identities and ideologies through . We argue that recursive performance of RWP stances creates a recognizable political style characteristic of Orbán’s RWP political persona or type.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1075/jlac.5.2.05bol
2017-11-23
2019-12-10
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

  1. Agha, Asif
    2005 “Voice, Footing, Enregisterment.” Journal of Linguistic Anthropology15(1):38–59. doi: 10.1525/jlin.2005.15.1.38
    https://doi.org/10.1525/jlin.2005.15.1.38 [Google Scholar]
  2. Blackledge, Adrian
    2006 “The Racialization of Language in British Political Discourse.” Critical Discourse Studies3(1):61–79. doi: 10.1080/17405900600589325
    https://doi.org/10.1080/17405900600589325 [Google Scholar]
  3. Blommaert, Jan
    2007 “Sociolinguistic Scales.” Intercultural Pragmatics4(1):1–19. doi: 10.1515/IP.2007.001
    https://doi.org/10.1515/IP.2007.001 [Google Scholar]
  4. Bolonyai, Agnes
    2016 “‘Sorry for Our Prime Minister!’: The Semiotic Landscape of Power & Resistance in a Poster-War on Immigration.” Annual Meeting of the American Association of Applied Linguistics. Orlando, FL.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Boukala, Salomi
    2016 “Rethinking Topos in the Discourse Historical Approach: Endoxon Seeking and Argumentation in Greek Media Discourses on ‘Islamist Terrorism.’” Discourse Studies18(3):249–268. doi: 10.1177/1461445616634550
    https://doi.org/10.1177/1461445616634550 [Google Scholar]
  6. Bourdieu, Pierre
    1991Language and Symbolic Power. Cambridge, UK: Blackwell.
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Bucholtz, Mary
    2009 “From Stance to Style: Gender, Interaction, and Indexicality in Mexican Immigrant Youth Slang.” InStance: Sociolinguistic Perspectives, edited by Alexandra Jaffe , 146–170. New York and London: Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195331646.003.0007
    https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195331646.003.0007 [Google Scholar]
  8. Charteris-Black, Jonathan
    2006 “Britain as a Container: Immigration Metaphors in the 2005 Election Campaign.” Discourse & Society17(5):563–581. doi: 10.1177/0957926506066345
    https://doi.org/10.1177/0957926506066345 [Google Scholar]
  9. De Certeau, Michel
    1984The Practice of Everyday Life. Berkeley: University of California Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Delanty, Gerard , Paul Jones , and Ruth Wodak
    2008 “Introduction: Migration, Discrimination and Belonging in Europe.” InIdentity, Belonging and Migration, edited by Gerard Delanty , Paul Jones and Ruth Wodak , 1–18. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Fekete, Liz
    2001 “The Emergence of Xeno-Racism.” Race & Class43(2): 23–40. doi: 10.1177/0306396801432003
    https://doi.org/10.1177/0306396801432003 [Google Scholar]
  12. Gal, Susan , and Judith T. Irvine
    1995 “The Boundaries of Languages and Disciplines: How Ideologies Construct Difference.” Social Research62(4):967–1001.
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Irvine, Judith T. , and Susan Gal
    2000 “Language Ideology and Linguistic Differentiation.” InRegimes of Language: Ideologies, Polities, and Identities, edited by Paul Kroskrity , 35–84. Santa Fe: School of American Research Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Kovács, András
    2013 “The Post-Communist Extreme Right: The Jobbik Party in Hungary.” InRight-Wing Populism in Europe: Politics and Discourse, edited by Ruth Wodak , Majid KhosraviNik , and Brigitte Mral , 223–233. London and New York: Bloomsbury.
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Krzyżanowski, Michał
    2013 “From Anti-Immigration and Nationalist Revisionism to Islamophobia: Continuities and Shifts in Recent Discourses and Patterns of Political Communication of the Freedom Party of Austria (FPÖ).” InRight-Wing Populism in Europe: Politics and Discourse, edited by Ruth Wodak , Majid KhosraviNik , and Brigitte Mral , 135–148. London and New York: Bloomsbury.
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Miles, Robert
    1989Racism. London: Routledge.
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Murer, Jeffrey Stevenson
    2015 “The Rise of Jobbik, Populism, and the Symbolic Politics of Illiberalism in Contemporary Hungary.” The Polish Quarterly of International Affairs2:79–102.
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Musolff, Andreas
    2015 “Dehumanizing Metaphors in UK Immigrant Debates in Press and Online Media.” Journal of Language Aggression and Conflict3(1):41–56. doi: 10.1075/jlac.3.1.02mus
    https://doi.org/10.1075/jlac.3.1.02mus [Google Scholar]
  19. Pelinka, Anton
    2013 “Right-Wing Populism: Concept and Typology.” InRight-Wing Populism in Europe: Politics and Discourse, edited by Ruth Wodak , Majid KhosraviNik , and Brigitte Mral , 3–22. London and New York: Bloomsbury.
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Reisigl, Martin
    2013 “Zur komminikativen Dimensions des Rechtpopulismus.” InPopulismus. Herausforderung oder Gefahr für eine Demokratie?, edited by Sir Peter Ustinov Institut , Anton Pelinka and Brigitte Haller , 141-162. Vienna: New Academic Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Reisigl, Martin and Ruth Wodak
    2001Discourse and Discrimination: Rhetoric of Racism and Anti-Semitism. London: Routledge.
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Santa Ana, Otto
    1999 “‘Like an Animal I was Treated’: Anti-Immigrant Metaphor in US Public Discourse.” Discourse & Society10(2):191–224. doi: 10.1177/0957926599010002004
    https://doi.org/10.1177/0957926599010002004 [Google Scholar]
  23. Sivanandan, Ambalavaner
    2001 “Poverty is the New Black.” Race & Class43(2): 1–5. doi: 10.1177/0306396801432001
    https://doi.org/10.1177/0306396801432001 [Google Scholar]
  24. Sotiris, Panagiotis
    2015 “Political Crisis and the Rise of the Far Right in Greece: Racism, Nationalism, Authoritarianism and Conservatism in the Discourse of Golden Dawn.” Journal of Language Aggression and Conflict3(1):173–199. doi: 10.1075/jlac.3.1.08sot
    https://doi.org/10.1075/jlac.3.1.08sot [Google Scholar]
  25. Stråth, Bo
    2008 “Belonging and European Identity.” InIdentity, Belonging and Migration, edited by Gerard Delanty , Paul Jones , and Ruth Wodak , 21–37. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press.
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Wodak, Ruth
    2011 “‘Us’ and ‘Them’: Inclusion and Exclusion – Discrimination via Discourse.” InMigration, Identity, and Belonging, edited by Gerard Delanty , Ruth Wodak , and Paul Jones , 54–77. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press. doi: 10.5949/UPO9781846314537.004
    https://doi.org/10.5949/UPO9781846314537.004 [Google Scholar]
  27. 2013 “‘Anything Goes!’ – The Haiderization of Europe.” InRight-Wing Populism in Europe: Politics and Discourse, edited by Ruth Wodak , Majid KhosraviNik , and Brigitte Mral , 23–37. London and New York: Bloomsbury.
    [Google Scholar]
  28. 2015The Politics of Fear: What Right-Wing Populist Discourses Mean. London: SAGE. doi: 10.4135/9781446270073
    https://doi.org/10.4135/9781446270073 [Google Scholar]
  29. Wodak, Ruth , and Salomi Boukala
    2014 “Talking about Solidarity and Security in the Age of Crisis: The Revival of Nationalism and Protectionism in the European Union – A Discourse-Historical Approach.” InEU Foreign Policy through the Lens of Discourse Analysis: Making Sense of Diversity, edited by Caterina Carta , and Jean-Frederic Morin , 171–190. Farnham, UK: Ashgate Publishing Ltd.
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Wodak, Ruth , and Bernhard Forchtner
    2014 “Embattled Vienna 1983/2010: Right-Wing Populism, Collective Memory and the Fictionisation of Politics.” Visual Communication13(2):231–255. doi: 10.1177/1470357213516720
    https://doi.org/10.1177/1470357213516720 [Google Scholar]
  31. van Dijk, Teun
    1992 “Discourse and the Denial of Racism.” Discourse & Society3(1):87–118. doi: 10.1177/0957926592003001005
    https://doi.org/10.1177/0957926592003001005 [Google Scholar]
  32. 2000 “Ideologies, Racism, Discourse: Debates on Immigration and Ethnic Issues.” InComparative Perspectives on Racism, edited by Jessica ter Wal and Maykel Verkuyten , 91–115. Aldershot: Ashgate.
    [Google Scholar]
  33. van Leeuwen, Theo
    2007 “Legitimation in Discourse and Communication.” Discourse and Communication1(1):91–112. doi: 10.1177/1750481307071986
    https://doi.org/10.1177/1750481307071986 [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1075/jlac.5.2.05bol
Loading
/content/journals/10.1075/jlac.5.2.05bol
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was successful
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error