1887
Volume 22, Issue 5
  • ISSN 1569-2159
  • E-ISSN: 1569-9862
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Abstract

Abstract

Addressing climate change requires engaging with the fluid, dynamic, and amorphous narrative of humanature relationships. I view environmental rhetoric as practices of storytelling that structure reality, guide actions, and shape understanding of the environment. Through rhetorical criticism, I analyzed fragments of climate activist discourse related to the narratives’ temporal and spatial scopes. I argue that reimagining the scope of our climate narratives’ temporal () and spatial () dimensions are inventional opportunities to motivate climate action toward more sustainable futures.

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/content/journals/10.1075/jlp.22128.blo
2023-06-27
2024-06-24
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): climate action; narratives; phronesis; scope; spatiality; temporality
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