1887
Volume 36, Issue 2
  • ISSN 0920-9034
  • E-ISSN: 1569-9870
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Abstract

Abstract

This study takes us to the South Pacific and concentrates on Bislama, one of the dialects of Melanesian pidgin (Siegel 2008: 4) and one of the official languages of Vanuatu. We take a discourse analysis perspective to map out the functions of , a conspicuous discourse marker in conversations and narratives. Using Labov & Waletzky (1967) model, we analyze the use of in narratives from the book (Lindstrom & Gwero 1998) and determine that is a discourse marker which indicates temporal sequence and consequence, frames speech reports and closes a digression. We conclude our study by considering a possible historical development of . We map out how French could have become Bislama using imposition and functional transfer (Siegel 2008Winford 2013a) of vernacular discourse markers (such as in Nguna).

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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): Bislama; discourse marker; functional transfer; imposition; narrative analysis; Vanuatu
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