1887
Volume 11, Issue 1
  • ISSN 1879-9264
  • E-ISSN: 1879-9272
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Abstract

Abstract

This paper offers an overview of current models of third language (L3) acquisition, classifying each as a Wholesale Transfer model or as a Piecemeal Transfer model. We discuss what we consider to be some conceptual and empirical problems for the Piecemeal Transfer approaches and then discuss some advantages we see in Wholesale Transfer. Next, we home in on Wholesale Transfer models, arguing that one of them in particular seems to us to be the most promising, viz., the Typological Primacy Model (TPM – e.g., Rothman, 20112015). Finally, we take up some open questions associated with the TPM and suggest some possible directions for future L3 research.

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Does Full Transfer Endure in L3A?

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Some challenges of relating wholesale transfer approaches to L3 linguistic behavior

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On transfer and third language acquisition

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Expanding the scope of L3 transfer study designs

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Retrodiction in science

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Transfer vs. dynamic cross-linguistic interactions

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When there’s no mirror image, and other L3 research design challenges

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Transfer patterns in L3 learning discussed

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What about partial access to UG?

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The plausibility of wholesale vs. property-by-property transfer in L3 acquisition

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Vindicating the need for a principled theory of language acquisition

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Cognitive states in third language acquisition and beyond
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