1887
Volume 4, Issue 2
  • ISSN 2543-3164
  • E-ISSN: 2543-3156
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Abstract

Abstract

In this article I apply the notions of and ( to the case of grassroots, migrant domestic worker (MDW) led activism during the COVID-19 pandemic in Hong Kong. I compare the chronotopes that are produced by the Hong Kong government with those produced by migrant-led organizations to understand how migrants are marginalized and how they resist this marginalization. More specifically, I show how the spatiotemporal configurations of “home,” “days off,” and “the time of COVID-19 in Hong Kong” are rechronotopized – that is, reimagined, remoralized and rematerialized – through the discourses and actions of these grassroots organizations. I use this data and analysis to reflect on how the notion of rechronotopization can account for the social processes involved in activism more broadly; and to draw attention to the dialectic relationship between differently scaled chronotopic materialities and morally loaded chronotopic imaginaries.

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2022-11-29
2024-04-17
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): activism; chronotope; COVID-19; materiality; migrant domestic workers (MDWs); morality
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