1887
Volume 4, Issue 2
  • ISSN 2543-3164
  • E-ISSN: 2543-3156
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Abstract

Abstract

In our contribution to this special issue on “Chronotopes & the COVID-19 Pandemic”, we discuss the complexities of and its dependence on . We argue that collective learning – and thus survival – is a sociolinguistic phenomenon and lay out a fractal system in which the related sociolinguistic processes play out. This system highlights the chronotopic-scalar situatedness of survival and captures the material, textual, and imagined aspects of learning and meaning-making. Drawing on interactions among a small group of Iranian migrants dealing with the effects of COVID-19, we discuss the processes through which participants dynamically construct and update their chronotopic images of their new circumstances, as they interact with material and semiotic data coming from multiple scales/centers. We show how the normative-semiotic indeterminacies caused by COVID-19 are navigated by social actors as they make sense of their spatiotemporal surroundings in pursuit of material and ideological survival.

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2022-11-25
2024-02-25
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): chronotopes; collective learning; COVID-19; fractality; scales; survival
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