1887
Volume 9, Issue 3
  • ISSN 2210-4119
  • E-ISSN: 2210-4127
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Abstract

Abstract

Over the past hundred years, linguistic schools have put forward and adopted either divergent or convergent positions regarding what language consists of. In this paper, I shall examine the dialogic turn in language study (i.e. language use is dialogic use, any action is dialogically directed either initiatively or reactively) so that readers can get an insight into the complexity of human communication. After the overview, I shall focus on some integrated components derived from the complex whole of dialogic action such as teaching, culture, business, courtroom interaction with a view to identifying the advantages of embracing dialogical theories of language and meaning.

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2019-10-29
2019-11-22
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  • Article Type: Review Article
Keyword(s): dialogue , holism , language-in-use and turning points
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