1887
Volume 11, Issue 1
  • ISSN 1879-7865
  • E-ISSN: 1879-7873
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Abstract

Abstract

This article presents the findings of a study on the development of case assignment in Icelandic as a second language within the context of Processability Theory (PT) and compares them with previous PT studies on the development of case in L2 German, Russian, and Serbian. We argue that initially, learners are only able to appropriately mark subjects and objects in canonical positions (e.g., ). Later they are also able to mark arguments with the appropriate case in sentences that deviate from canonical word order (e.g., ). In order to examine the case development in L2 Icelandic, 148 learners were asked to fill in the blanks of sentences with missing core arguments. Our results replicate for the most part the previous findings for L2 German, Russian, and Serbian. As such, the present study adds to the typological plausibility of PT as a framework that predicts and explains developmental sequences.

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2020-06-04
2020-12-01
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