1887
Volume 43, Issue 1
  • ISSN 0731-3500
  • E-ISSN: 2214-5907
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Abstract

Abstract

The paper presents an overview of negative expression in Liangmai, an under-described Tibeto-Burman language, primarily spoken in the Northeast Indian states of Manipur and Nagaland. There are two ways of negative formation in the language: (i) by suffixing negative markers to the main verb, and (ii) by the use of negative particles. The main negative suffixes in Liangmai are , mainly used with realis constructions; , used mainly with irrealis constructions; and with imperative, giving a prohibitive meaning. Negative particles used in the language include , which is a negative existential and , used to express ‘undesirability’. Additionally, a negative interjection is used frequently in the language as a negative answer to a question or to contradict a statement perceived to be incorrect. Negative polarity items are form by suffixing to nominal stems and numerals. The present paper offers a descriptive account of negation in Liangmai, providing an overview of various constructions, namely, declarative, interrogative, imperative, relative and hortative, with negative polarity in the language.

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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): declarative , imperative , Liangmai , negation , relative and Tibeto-Burman
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