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Abstract

Abstract

In this paper I lay out some of the main theoretical methodological principles that underlie a narratives-as-practices approach and discuss three foci that emerge from current research and pave the way for future investigations. In particular, I focus on mobility, connectivity, time/space anchoring and chronotopicity as both characteristics of narrative and research areas which allow for an integration of the focus of interactional approaches on emergence with a consideration of the historical and social embedding of narratives into practices. I review recent research that has contributed to this trend in narrative studies and discuss some of the limitations of current work and areas that need further investigation. I advocate for an expansion of research on a wider variety of practices, attention to the characteristics of narrative genres, and in general a stronger critical engagement with ways in which narratives participate in social processes involving power and inequality.

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2020-11-17
2020-11-25
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keywords: chronotopes; stories; ethnography; reflexivity; storytelling; narrative practices
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