1887
Volume 16, Issue 2-3
  • ISSN 1018-2101
  • E-ISSN: 2406-4238

Abstract

Despite interviewers having a wide range of strategies to elicit talk, English language interviewers overwhelmingly use syntactic questions. In contrast, most turns in Japanese semi-formal television interviews end in non-interrogative forms, and other methods are used to achieve smooth turn yielding. This study looks at the interviewers’ turns and examines how interviewees recognize turn-yielding. It argues that interviewers prefer using interviewing strategies other than canonical question forms to avoid any possible FTA (face threatening act).

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2006-01-01
2019-09-17
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): Conversation analysis , Japanese , Question , Television interviews and Turn-taking
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