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image of Mi-nominalizations in Japanese Wakamono Kotoba ‘youth language’
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Abstract

Abstract

This article explores grammatical and functional properties of -nominalizations in Japanese ‘youth language.’ In the standard variety, the suffix - nominalizes an adjective stem: ‘deep-’ (= ‘profoundness’). This suffix is also used in youth language, but its productivity has expanded considerably. To mention a few, - applies to not only an adjective (stem) but also a verb, a noun, a pronoun, their phrasal counterparts, and even an onomatopoeia. We claim that these properties of - are flexibly captured in the framework of nominalization recently proposed by Masayoshi Shibatani. This framework leads us to describe further unique properties of -nominalization, such as “double nominalization” where an already-nominalized form undergoes a further nominalization process and the “sentential use” of a nominalized structure where a nominalized element functions as a sentence, with which an illocutionary speech act is performed.

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/content/journals/10.1075/prag.20006.ser
2020-11-10
2021-02-24
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