1887
Volume 8, Issue 3
  • ISSN 1878-9714
  • E-ISSN: 1878-9722
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Abstract

This article discusses the conceptual difficulties that are involved in the understanding of several basic linguistic notions: namely , , , , , , and in particular, . Using the definitions provided in various sources, particularly introductory textbooks and dictionaries of linguistics, I examine the ways in which these terms are explained, and discuss how there is actually no consensus on how they are understood and conceptualised. This is particularly true for the term , which is regarded by many linguists as a neutral and ideology-free unit for research. In this article, I show that whether a set of linguistic features is regarded as a variety depends on three main factors; there is no absolute – and thus, ideologically neutral – way that linguists can refer to this concept when considering what is or is not a linguistic variety.

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2017-10-13
2019-11-20
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