1887
Volume 8, Issue 4
  • ISSN 1878-9714
  • E-ISSN: 1878-9722
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Abstract

Recent research has established that Japanese political oratory and audience behaviour ( Bull & Feldman 2011 ; Feldman & Bull 2012 ) are fundamentally different to those found in British political speeches ( Heritage & Greatbatch 1986 ). To further develop these cross-cultural analyses of political rhetoric, speaker-audience interaction was analysed in ten speeches by the two second-round candidates in the 2012 French presidential elections (François Hollande; Nicolas Sarkozy). Analogous to British speeches, French speeches were characterised by “implicit” affiliative response invitations and asynchronous speaker-audience interaction, in contrast to Japanese “explicit” invitations and synchrony. These results were interpreted in terms of Hofstede’s (2001) individualism-collectivism cultural dimensions. Dissimilarities in audience responses between the two candidates were also identified and discussed. The analysis of cross-cultural differences continues to reveal the intricate differences between societies, and ensures academic understanding on rhetoric is not boxed into crude universal rules.

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2018-01-19
2019-08-21
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): applause , audience response , cross-cultural analysis , French , political speeches and rhetoric
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