1887
Volume 17, Issue 1
  • ISSN 1877-9751
  • E-ISSN: 1877-976X
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Abstract

Abstract

This paper is a contribution to a hitherto unexplored area in English-Czech contrastive semantics. It examines differences in the construal of walking, the most prototypical type of human locomotion. Based on the data from , a synchronic parallel translation corpus, it presents a cognitive oriented analysis of the semantics of English and its nearest Czech counterparts, i.e. and . Despite their apparent commonalities, the verbs in question do not construe walking in the same way. In contrast to , the construal of a motion situation in and involves focus on leg movements and bodily position, amounting to a marked segmentation of the motion into individual quanta. Focus on leg movements and verticality of the body is even more pronounced in , which can then serve an evaluative function; such a possibility is not open for thus occupies an intermediate position between the two verbs.

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2019-08-20
2019-09-17
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