1887
Volume 19, Issue 1
  • ISSN 1877-9751
  • E-ISSN: 1877-976X
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Abstract

Abstract

This paper aims to construct a cultural model of in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) by probing into its conceptual metaphors based on a contextualized semantic analysis of in (HDIC). It is found that there are eight conceptual metaphors of , each involving experiential correlation between source and target concept. To be specific, builds up a major metonymic basis for the metaphorical mappings from the source concept of (i.e., ) to the target concepts, including and . It is worth special noting that is understood in terms of the motion of in TCM. The conceptual metaphor is Chinese culture-specific. On the whole, conceptual metaphors of form a conceptual network and further constitute a cultural model: as the substance origin of human life is believed in TCM to function by ceaseless motion, giving rise to wellness or illness. This cultural model reflects a pair of inseparable concepts in ancient Chinese philosophy, viz. substance and (its) function, with the former being primary, essential and original, while the latter, secondary, concomitant and derivational.

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2021-04-28
2021-10-18
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