1887
Volume 20, Issue 1
  • ISSN 1877-9751
  • E-ISSN: 1877-976X
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Abstract

Abstract

I explore some relationships between metonymy and a special type of hyperbole that I call . Reflexive hyperbole provides a unified, simple explanation of certain natural meanings of statements such as the following: and . The meanings, while of seemingly disparate types, are deeply united: they are all hyperbolic about some contextually salient relationship that has a special property that I call “broad reflexivity.” Although a few of the types of meaning of interest have metonymic aspects (or metaphorical aspects), reflexive hyperbole cannot just be explained by a straightforward application of metonymy theory (or metaphor theory). Indeed, I argue instead for a dependency in the converse direction: that much and perhaps even all metonymy is rooted – if sometimes slightly indirectly – in broadly reflexive relationships, though not usually in a hyperbolic way.

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2022-05-24
2024-03-01
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): hyperbole; metonymy; reflexivity in relationships
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