1887
Volume 20, Issue 1
  • ISSN 1877-9751
  • E-ISSN: 1877-976X
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Abstract

Abstract

Why should Jesus die? I attempt to investigate the symbolic roots and significance of the crucifixion by means of the conceptual tools and methodology of cognitive semantics. In particular, I propose that we approach the meaning of Jesus’ death on four symbolic levels:

  • the level where Jesus is a sacrificial lamb;
  • the level where Jesus is a scapegoat and a sufferer for people’s sins;
  • the level where Jesus is a redeemer and a savior;
  • the level where Jesus is bread and wine in the Holy Communion.

I suggest that all four levels prove distinct yet interdependent interpretations for the crucifixion. The different interpretations bring to the fore different aspects of the figure of Jesus and his death. While all of these aspects have been studied extensively by various authors from a cognitive linguistic perspective, my focus will be on the interrelations and interdependence of the four interpretations of Jesus’ figure and death.

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2022-05-24
2024-04-17
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