1887
Volume 27, Issue 3
  • ISSN 0378-4177
  • E-ISSN: 1569-9978
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Abstract

Grammaticalization is based on universal strategies of conceptual transfer. Contact-induced language change on the other hand is an areally confined process resulting from specific historical events. What this suggests is that the two constitute quite divergent phenomena and, in fact, in the relevant literature they tend to be described as mutually exclusive processes. Accordingly, this literature abounds with discussions on whether some specific grammatical change is due to the former or the latter. The position taken in this paper is that the two are in no way mutually exclusive; rather, perhaps more often than not, they jointly conspire in triggering grammatical change.
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/content/journals/10.1075/sl.27.3.04hei
2003-01-01
2019-10-15
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References

http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1075/sl.27.3.04hei
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  • Article Type: Research Article
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